Serving notice – still not as simple as it sounds!

The serving of notices sometimes feels more akin to bomb disposal, than posting a letter. The slightest wrong turn can potentially prove fatal! Unfortunately that has only been compounded by a recent Scottish case. Courts have generally taken a strict approach to the contractual or statutory requirements governing the form and service of notices. The safety nets they […]


Beware the fake seller

To quote from the Nazi dentist played by Laurence Olivier in the movie Marathon Man; “Is it safe?”; well for a buyer’s solicitor it may not be if there is a fake seller. The judgment in Dreamvar (UK) Limited v. Mishcon de Reya is controversial, and will almost certainly be appealed, but it tells us […]

Employment law update

Major developments in employment law are expected to take place in 2017, Katee Dias outlines the main changes. Employment Tribunal Fees Fees were introduced in 2013 for all Employment Tribunal claims. However, the lawfulness of this was questioned and the latest hearing in the long running legal challenge by UNISON is expected to be heard […]


Landmark ruling by Supreme Court on unmarried couples’ rights (In the matter of an application by Denise Brewster for Judicial Review (Northern Ireland) [2017] UKSC 8)

On 8 February 2017, a judgment was handed down in the Supreme Court, in a case concerning a requirement in a fairly obscure piece of legislation, the Local Pension Scheme (Benefits, Membership and Contributions) Regulations 2009 (the “2009 Regulations”). The 2009 Regulations provide for the payment of retirement pensions to members of the scheme and […]

Pimlico Plumbers and Mr Smith – latest judgment: self employed contractor entitled to holiday leave and pay as a “worker”

Judgement was recently given by the Court of Appeal on a landmark case in the field of employment, Pimlico Plumbers and Mullins v Gary Smith, which has been working its way though the courts. It has put plumbers engaged with Pimlico in the spotlight for similar reasons as for other groups working within the “gig […]


Draft e-Privacy Regulation published by EU Commission

On 10 January 2017, the European Commission presented its formal proposals for a new ePrivacy Regulation. These represent an overhaul of privacy rules relating to direct marketing, cookies and similar technologies, and other forms of online monitoring. The Commission’s aim is to have the new Regulation adopted by 25 May 2018. Accordingly, unless the UK […]

Recent ruling highlights different disclosure requirements for accountants and solicitors

Question: what is the extent of solicitors’ duty of disclosure, and in particular is there a duty to disclose information gained from acting for one client to another? The decision in Harlequin Property (SVG) Limited v Wilkins Kennedy (a Firm) [2016] EWHC 3188 (TCC) held that accountants do not owe such a duty and in […]


Lessons for the food and restaurant trade from the Fabric case

The high profile closure of Fabric, and recent resolution to enable it to re-open, may seem a far cry from the average retail food offering. Much of it was! However, there are some important points to take on board, which are applicable more widely. First of all, know your permitted hours and conditions. All those […]

My Submission to Lord Justice Jackson’s Review of “Fixed Recoverable Costs”

Jonathan Haydn-Williams has made a written submission to Lord Justice Jackson’s review of “Fixed Recoverable Costs”. His 30 second summary: Jackson LJ is to report later in the year on proposals to limit the legal costs which a successful party can recover from the losing one, in claims up to £250,000. I think it is […]